Enrichment Framework

Our framework is designed to provide every dog in your care with a lifestyle that allows them to practice experiences that result in rich mental, emotional, physical, and intuitive growth.

In captivity, food, water, and shelter are supplied, territory is delineated, social groupings are usually fairly stable and structured, the risks of predation are minimal (almost zero) and there is a severe lack in quality of characteristics that enhance captive living.

Captive living strips animals of their abilities to pursue conditions that help them thrive. We would like to think that captive habitats have made it possible for every animal to be a survivor but maybe they are causing more distress and weakness in the total animal.

The aim of Doglando University is to provide you, the dog care professional, with a historical perspective of what dogs were bred to do, and their ability to form close “working / collaborative and mutually respectful” relationships with humans throughout evolution, and use this information to follow a clearly defined framework to meet deepest needs of companion dogs.

Doglando’s Hierarchy of Needs

hover over / click images below for description

Intuitive Needs

Intuitive Needs

When referring to Doglando’s Hierarchy of Needs, we begin at the bottom, with “Intuitive Needs”. The foundational criteria for every dog’s development is the ability to follow their intuition when learning. When a dog is nurtured to follow their intuition, beginning at the earliest phase of life – birth – we belive this puppy has an “advantage” in life.

Emotional Needs

Emotional Needs

Following this bottom-up approach, when a puppy’s intuition is nurtured, they are also protecting their emotional fragility. Early reomoval and isolation fuels their emotional fragility, and more times than not, this has lasting effects. We believe that when the emotional fragility of a puppy or dog is not protected, they are likely to experience fear, stress, anxiety, and aggression – all common behavioral problems reported by dog parents.

Nutritional Needs

Nutritional Needs

Puppies born in restricted captivity are severely impacted by nutrition from the very beginning of their lives, due to early weaning and early transition onto hard food (worse when the quality is poor), creating a massive disturbance to the development of their digestive organs and well-being.

Physical Needs

Physical Needs

Companion dogs, sadly, are facing so many pressures forcing them to become inhibited and helpless – certainly not free. Our lifestyles for companion dogs do not promote physical wellness; hence, an increase in weakness and obesity in our dogs.

Mental Needs

Mental Needs

As an Enrichment Center for Dogs, we believe it is our responsibility to initiate advancement and progression for the way companion dogs live, and give them more than just an outlet for “mental” stimulation… we must reconnect them to the great outdoors and allow them to engage with us in a simpler manner.

Behavioral Needs

Behavioral Needs

We strive to consider each one of these needs, by creating an environment that is compatible to each dog as an individual; one in which we can behaviorally observe, measure, and remain unambiguous that every dog in our care is thriving.

Intuitive Needs

When referring to Doglando’s Hierarchy of Needs, we begin at the bottom, with “Intuitive Needs”. the foundational criteria for every dog’s development is the ability to follow their intuition when learning. When a dog is nurtured to follow their intuition, beginning at the earliest phase of life – birth – we believe this puppy has an “advantage” in life.

Emotional Needs

Following this bottom-up approach, when a puppy’s intuition is nurtured, they are also protecting their emotional fragility. Early reomoval and isolation fuels their emotional fragility, and more times than not, this has lasting effects. We believe that when the emotional fragility of a puppy or dog is not protected, they are likely to experience fear, stress, anxiety, and aggression – all common behavioral problems reported by dog parents.

Nutritional Needs

Puppies born in restricted captivity are severely impacted by nutrition from the very beginning of their lives, due to early weaning and early transition onto hard food (worse when the quality is poor), creating a massive disturbance to the development of their digestive organs and well-being.

Physical Needs

Companion dogs, sadly, are facing so many pressures forcing them to become inhibited and helpless – certainly not free. Our lifestyles for companion dogs do not promote physical wellness; hence, an increase in weakness and obesity in our dogs.

Mental Needs

As an Enrichment Center for Dogs, we believe it is our responsibility to initiate advancement and progression for the way companion dogs live, and give them more than just an outlet for “mental” stimulation… we must reconnect them to the great outdoors and allow them to engage with us in a simpler manner.

Behavioral Needs

We strive to consider each one of these needs, by creating an environment that is compatible to each dog as an individual; one in which we can behaviorally observe, measure, and remain unambiguous that every dog in our care is thriving.

The 8 Spheres of Enrichment

Environmental Enrichment Devices

“EEDs” serve multiple purposes, and are designed to evoke positive, species-specific behaviors by letting that animal or human engage with the device in a way that is both natural to them and takes their unique senses into account.

Habitat Enrichment

A habitat is any space, natural or designed, where a being lives, works, eat, sleeps, or plays. A rich habitat encompasses diverse sensory and bodily experiences, without becoming too chaotic. It helps meet the needs a being has and has intentional design elements to encourage positive behaviors.

Sensory Enrichment

Everyone’s got 5 senses: sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste. Humans tend to over-focus on sight, but the things we smell, hear, touch, and taste in our daily lives impact everything from our moods to our sleep patterns. This is why it’s so important to be mindful and intentional when enriching our environment with sensory experiences.

Food Enrichment

Food is important on a basic, keeping-a-being-alive level. But food is also important on an enriched, experiential level. Everyone’s individual dietary needs are different, and some can be serious, which is why it’s important to seek the advice of a doctor, nutritionist, or veterinarian to create a healthy diet. 

Social Group Enrichment

Social groups have different behavioral norms. Social group enrichment is intentionally cultivating a positive, trust-filled social experience, based on the known needs and behaviors of the kinds of beings in the group.

Behavioral Conditioning Enrichment

Behavioral conditioning uses a dog’s natural motivations – to seek what is rewarding to them and avoid what punishes them – to try to induce one behavior over another. The way to make this ordinary behavioral conditioning truly enriching is to discover the ways that we are all individuals.

Relationship Enrichment

While social grouping is about how a person engages with an entire group, relationship enrichment is about two individuals and their personalities. The difference between a typical friendship and a profound, close friendship involves a strengthening of trust over time.

Physical Handling Conditioning

Enriching the way one experiences touch can mean being honest with ourselves, and scientifically observant of other creatures, about what feels positive versus what feels stressful – even if those feelings are differnet from those in our culture, our family, or our species. Physical handling conditioning lets a dog acclimate to positive social touch over time.

Environmental Enrichment Devices

Environmental Enrichment Devices

“EEDs” serve multiple purposes, and are designed to evoke positive, species-specific behaviors by letting that animal or human engage with the device in a way that is both natural to them and takes their unique senses into account.

Habitat Enrichment

Habitat Enrichment

A habitat is any space, natural or designed, where a being lives, works, eat, sleeps, or plays. A rich habitat encompasses diverse sensory and bodily experiences, without becoming too chaotic. It helps meet the needs a being has and has intentional design elements to encourage positive behaviors.

Sensory Enrichment

Sensory Enrichment

Everyone’s got 5 senses: sight, smell, hearing, touch, and taste. Humans tend to over-focus on sight, but the things we smell, hear, touch, and taste in our daily lives impact everything from our moods to our sleep patterns. This is why it’s so important to be mindful and intentional when enriching our environment with sensory experiences.

Food Enrichment

Food Enrichment

Food is important on a basic, keeping-a-being-alive level. But food is also important on an enriched, experiential level. Everyone’s individual dietary needs are different, and some can be serious, which is why it’s important to seek the advice of a doctor, nutritionist, or veterinarian to create a healthy diet. 

Social Group Enrichment

Social Group Enrichment

Social groups have different behavioral norms. Social group enrichment is intentionally cultivating a positive, trust-filled social experience, based on the known needs and behaviors of the kinds of beings in the group.

Behavioral Conditioning Enrichment

Behavioral Conditioning Enrichment

Behavioral conditioning uses a dog’s natural motivations – to seek what is rewarding to them and avoid what punishes them – to try to induce one behavior over another. The way to make this ordinary behavioral conditioning truly enriching is to discover the ways that we are all individuals.

Relationship Enrichment

Relationship Enrichment

While social grouping is about how a person engages with an entire group, relationship enrichment is about two individuals and their personalities. The difference between a typical friendship and a profound, close friendship involves a strengthening of trust over time.

Physical Handling Conditioning

Physical Handling Conditioning

Enriching the way one experiences touch can mean being honest with ourselves, and scientifically observant of other creatures, about what feels positive versus what feels stressful – even if those feelings are differnet from those in our culture, our family, or our species. Physical handling conditioning lets a dog acclimate to positive social touch over time.

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